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Strengthening the Conservation of Sweet Chestnut Trees in the United Kingdom-India Education | Latest Education News India | Global Education News

London: Scientists are stepping up their fight against the oriental dryocosmus kuritama, an invading pest of sweet chestnut trees. The UK Chief Plant Hygiene Officer announced today.

The release of a parasitoid wasp called Torymus sinensis, a natural biological control agent, has been approved to control the spread of sweet chestnuts and protect the health of sweet chestnut trees.

This natural pest control method works by using Torymus sinensis to kill the Oriental Chestnut Garwasp and thereby the British pest control.

The Oriental Dryocosmus kuritama was first discovered in the United Kingdom in 2015. This gall wasp causes humps on sweet chestnut buds and leaves, damaging trees. In many cases, gall wasps can weaken sweet chestnut trees and make them more vulnerable to other pests and diseases, including chestnut blight.

Chugokuou already exists naturally in the United Kingdom, but the number is very small. Further release of parasitoids allows the population to increase to levels that effectively control the Oriental Chestnut Garwasp. This method of biological control is well used in many European countries.

Nicholas Spence, Chief Plant Health Officer, said:
The threat to sweet chestnut trees is increasing as a result of pests and diseases such as oriental dryocosmus kuritama and sweet chestnut blight. The release of this biocontrol agent is a major step towards protecting the health of sweet chestnut trees and will further enhance the resilience of our tree landscape.

Today’s announcement is carefully commissioned by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Areas in collaboration with Fera Science Ltd to ensure extensive research, thorough risk assessment, and safe and controlled release of parasitoids in the United Kingdom. It follows the test.

Biological pest control releases are carefully regulated and have been approved by the government as a result of strong scientific reviews by advisory committees and public consultations on environmental releases. Fera Science Ltd will carefully manage releases using a monitoring program for the next 10 years.

Neil Audsley, Senior Scientist at Fera Science Ltd, said:
Following an extensive research program and thorough risk assessment, biological control agents to reduce the oriental chestnut bee population can be released. Biological control is the safest and most effective means of controlling pests such as the Oriental chestnut gall wasp. This strategy has been successfully used in countries throughout Europe and directly contributes to improving the health of sweet chestnut trees in the United Kingdom.

The release of Torymus sinensis is part of the government’s long-term strategic response to managing threats from tree pests and diseases and achieving the goals of the Tree Health Restoration Strategy (2018). Defra will continue to work with world-leading scientists and colleagues from the Forestry Commission and the Department for Environment, Food and Veterinary Medicine to protect the UK’s sweet chestnuts from existing and emerging threats.

Forest Research scientists are currently conducting further research on the pests and diseases of the sweet chestnut tree, including research on the oriental dryocosmus kuritama and sweet chestnut blight.

Strengthening the Conservation of Sweet Chestnut Trees in the United Kingdom-India Education | Latest Education News India | Global Education News

Source link Strengthening the Conservation of Sweet Chestnut Trees in the United Kingdom-India Education | Latest Education News India | Global Education News

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