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Sherisse Laud-Hammond looks back on the tears of change as director of the Penn Women’s Center – India Education, Education News India, Education News

Last year, Cheris Loud Hammond was appointed as the new director of the Penn Women’s Center (PWC). At this center, she was the first black woman to serve as a colored woman. A 2005 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practices (SP2) Social Work Master’s Program, Loudhammond’s previous social work education and career, and her continued dedication to social justice and change, she explains. Definitely clear when you do her goals and vision for PWC.

Relocating the center as a more comprehensive, diverse and representative space for the Penn community was at the top of Loud Hammond’s priority list. Also, in her first year as a director, she has led a huge success in her rebranding and financing efforts for this purpose. Oversee a timely and reputable roster of virtual programming during the unprecedented challenge brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prior to the pandemic, PWC increased the number of events and classes held at the center by 30%. During the pandemic, PWC shifted its focus to zoom programming, hosted a community lunch, attended a virtual Take Back the Night online with 300 people, and continued the wellness series with the Netter Center and the African American Resource Center. And mindfulness meditation, financial wellness, psychological health. In response to the killings of members of the black community, PWC co-sponsored and co-promoted a circle of black healing and solidarity.

Loud Hammond’s path to PWC began with education. “I taught a sophomore in a school district in Philadelphia,” she says. “Some of my students had behavioral problems, and I noticed that many of them didn’t have breakfast at home before school. We were together in class I started eating breakfast, and behavioral problems almost disappeared. The lesson made me think more about the high rate of black children and adolescents diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. I saw my students seemingly labeled and misdiagnosed. I wanted to know more about mental health and health disparities. Racial and environmental factors such as poverty and food insecurity in student behavior and achievement. I felt asked to study the role. “

This led her into a mental health career move — a move that almost kept her away from the pen. “After teaching, I worked for a mental health institution in Philadelphia. My manager was active Disappointment My ambition to go on to graduate school. She said the pen would be too stiff and too expensive. She told me she couldn’t do that, “says Loud Hammond. I was so upset and determined that I applied it only to SP2. I motivated her negativeness and disappointment to inspire my goals. And I entered. “

Sherisse Laud-Hammond looks back on the tears of change as director of the Penn Women’s Center – India Education, Education News India, Education News

Source link Sherisse Laud-Hammond looks back on the tears of change as director of the Penn Women’s Center – India Education, Education News India, Education News

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