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See photo: Thousands of people rushed to South African villages to mine diamonds, eventually leaving only Quartz

Recently, more than 3,000 people have gathered in the remote village of Kwafrati in South Africa. Nomads have discovered “diamonds” in the area.

But officials said over the weekend that these unidentified stones, which captivated thousands of people seeking good luck, are not diamonds, but relatively low-value crystals.

“It was finally revealed that the stones found in the area were not diamonds,” a statement from a local government said. The state government also shared a video on Twitter, expressing concern about what’s called a “diamond rush.”

People seeking good luck dig up stones after the word spreads. The stone can be a diamond. (Reuters)

“We were concerned about reports of illegal mining activities in Kwafrati, a suburb of Ladies’ Smith,” the government said.

“The stones found in the area are ultimately not diamonds, as some have hoped,” Ravi Pilley, state executive councilor for economic development and tourism, told Reuters. It became clear. “

This location is about 300 km from Johannesburg, on the edge of the cardo dolerite sill, which is not in the diamond zone. (Reuters)

Currently, the number of people on the site has dropped to less than 500. However, 5 hectares (12 acres) are covered with holes up to 1 meter, which has already caused great damage. This poses a danger to cattle.

Mr. Piray said people in the field are encouraged to leave as a large crowd threatens the Covid-19 epidemic. If they do not comply, law enforcement agencies will be asked to make sure the site is cleared.

Why this sudden “diamond rush”?

The lack of stone analysis did not discourage those seeking good luck, as thousands of people with picks, shovels and forks on either side of the gravel road were found just a few meters from the field.

“We were concerned about reports of illegal mining activities in Kwafrati, a suburb of Ladies’ Smith,” the government said. (Reuters)

The discovery was life-changing, bargain Mend Sabello told Reuters last week that he had a handful of small stones.

“This means that our lives will change because no one was doing the right job. I do a strange job. When I go home with them (family) I was really overjoyed, “said the two 27-year-old fathers.

KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is one of the poorest regions in the country.

The place is reportedly about 300 kilometers away from Johannesburg. It is on the edge of a cardo dolerite sill, which is not in the zone where diamonds are usually found.

Thousands of people flocked to hillside villages with picks and shovels to dig the area to make property for them. (Reuters)

In a sense, the event highlighted the socio-economic challenges facing the locals, Pilei reportedly said Reuters. People in the area also expressed concern about road quality and access to water, saying local authorities would address it in the coming days.

South Africa’s economy has long suffered from very high levels of unemployment, trapping the poverty of millions and contributing to the serious inequality that has continued for nearly 30 years since the end of apartheid in 1994.

The unidentified stone that fascinated thousands of people seeking good luck was not a diamond, but a relatively low-value crystal. (Reuters)

South Africa’s economy was already in recession before the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020. Shutdowns and ongoing restrictions caused a serious economic contraction in 2020.

South Africa accounts for about 40% of all recorded African Covid-19 infections and is currently suffering from a rapid surge, but vaccine deployment has been delayed and is characterized by delayed delivery, among other factors. is.

Click here for full coverage of India Today.in on the coronavirus pandemic.

See photo: Thousands of people rushed to South African villages to mine diamonds, eventually leaving only Quartz

Source link See photo: Thousands of people rushed to South African villages to mine diamonds, eventually leaving only Quartz

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