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Scientists capture the exact moment of impact as meteoroids explode in Jupiter’s atmosphere-Technology News, Firstpost

Using NASA’s Juno spacecraft to check Jupiter’s aurora, researchers were able to see a very bright meteor explosion last year. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) team at the Southwest Institute claims to have captured a fireball, a very bright meteor explosion in Jupiter’s upper atmosphere. A statement The Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has announced that the lead author, Dr. Rohini Giles, says that Jupiter is affected by a huge number each year, and that effect itself is not uncommon. However, they are so short-lived that it is relatively rare to see them.

Jupiter looks like a Juneau spacecraft. Image courtesy of NASA

According to Giles, we can only see greater impact from Earth, and we need to be very lucky to point the telescope at Jupiter at the right time. According to Giles, in the last two decades, amateur astronomers have been able to capture six effects on Jupiter. The new observations by SwRI researchers are from a small snapshot of just 17 milliseconds, and researchers don’t know what happened to the bright flash outside that time frame.

“But it must have been quite short-lived, as we know it wasn’t seen in the previous or later spins,” Giles added. Researchers believe that the flash was not a temporary two-line event (TLE). Optical events at altitudes in the stratosphere and mesosphere / low ionosphere last only 1-2 milliseconds and are directly related to the underlying thunderstorm electrical activity.

The area imaged by Juno's UVS instrument on April 10, 2020 shows that a large meteoroid exploded in the bright fireball of Jupiter's upper atmosphere. The UVS band contains part of Jupiter's northern aurora ellipse, which appears pure green and represents hydrogen release. In contrast, the bright spots appear almost yellow and show considerable emission at longer wavelengths. Image: SwRI / NASA

The area imaged by Juno’s UVS instrument on April 10, 2020 shows that a large meteoroid exploded in the bright fireball of Jupiter’s upper atmosphere. The UVS band contains part of Jupiter’s northern aurora ellipse, which appears pure green and represents hydrogen release. In contrast, the bright spots appear almost yellow and show considerable emission at longer wavelengths. Image: SwRI / NASA

However, the duration and spectral shape of the flash are very well in line with what scientists expected from the impact. Studies have shown that strong flashes stand out in the data because they have very different spectral characteristics from the UV radiation from Jupiter’s aurora.

According to Giles, the impact’s UV spectrum showed radiation emitted by the blackbody at temperatures close to 9,600 Kelvin (9,328 ° C), 140 miles above the planet’s cloud top. .. By observing the intensity of the flash, the authors of the study estimated that it was caused by an impactor with a mass of 250-1,500 kilograms.



Scientists capture the exact moment of impact as meteoroids explode in Jupiter’s atmosphere-Technology News, Firstpost

Source link Scientists capture the exact moment of impact as meteoroids explode in Jupiter’s atmosphere-Technology News, Firstpost

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