Sports

India vs Australia: Description-Why Steve Smith adopted DRS for a straight catch from the glove

Steve Smith spent an important half-century to put Australia in the driver’s seat at the fourth match against India on Monday in Brisbane. The former Australian captain made 74-55 and helped to extend Australia’s lead with aggressive blows.

Rohit Sharma plays Steve Smith who saw shadow batting during an Australian inning

When Smith reviewed the catch decision, there was an interesting moment, even though the ball apparently fell from the glove to the second slip. The delivery from Mohammed Shiraji bounced more than Smith expected, struck his gloves and threw it at Ajinka Rahane. Smith pointed to his glove and quivered in pain, but still went for a review.

“Umpire Robro”-Rohit Sharma raises his finger in the umpire Paul Wilson enjoys Twitter and watches the video

why?

No, it wasn’t a “brain decline” for Smith, but instead betrayed a very good perception of Cricket’s Law.

The relevant laws are as follows:

5.6 Contact with the ball

“In these laws,

5.6.1 Reference to the bat shall mean that the bat is held in the batter’s hand or gloves worn on his / her hand, unless otherwise stated.

Contact between the 5.6.2 ball and any of 5.6.2.1 to 5.6.2.4

5.6.2.1 The bat itself

5.6.2.2 Batter’s hand holding a bat

5.6.2.3 Any part of the glove worn on the hand of Batman holding a bat

The ball is considered to have hit, touched, or hit the bat. “

Simply put, if Smith’s glove didn’t have a bat when the ball hit the glove, he wouldn’t have gone out. Smith took the review thinking he had taken off his gloves in time, but it wasn’t. Nevertheless, it was a risk worth taking.





India vs Australia: Description-Why Steve Smith adopted DRS for a straight catch from the glove

Source link India vs Australia: Description-Why Steve Smith adopted DRS for a straight catch from the glove

Related Articles

Back to top button