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Children with mild COVID-19 may not develop antibodies.Oral vaccine boosters are promising in monkey research, Health News, ET Health World

Nancy Rapid

The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19. They require further research to support the findings and include studies that have not yet been certified by peer review.

Children with mild COVID-19 may subsequently be deficient in antibodies

Australian studies suggest that children infected with mild COVID-19 may not be able to subsequently develop antibodies to the virus. The researchers compared 57 children with 51 adults with mild COVID-19 or asymptomatic infections. Only 37% of children appeared to develop antibodies compared to 76% of adults-researchers found that even if the viral load was similar in the two groups. Paul Richardy, research leader at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Melbourne, said children’s bodies did not appear to produce a secondary cell-mediated immune response to the virus like adults did. All participants in the study were infected in 2020, his team reported on Monday in medRxiv prior to a peer review. “Whether this also happens with current circulating variants (deltas) requires further investigation and research to understand why children are less likely to develop antibody reactions after SARS-CoV-2 infection.” Licciardi said. “It is not known if this means that children are more susceptible to reinfection.”

Experimental oral COVID-19 vaccine is promising in monkeys

The COVID-19 booster vaccine, which can be given orally to people who already have antibodies from vaccination or previous infections, has promising results in monkeys and soon humans, according to the company developing it. May be tested with. Oral boosters are conventional vaccines in which a harmless carrier virus delivers coronavirus protein to cells on the surface of the tongue or on the lining of the cheeks and throat, stimulating the production of antibodies that can block the virus before it steps into the body. Using the technology Dr. Stephen Russell, Chief Officer of Vyriad in Rochester, Minnesota, who led the study, said. “Not only is the oral COVID-19 vaccine more convenient and acceptable, but it can also improve immunity because it is given to sites where the COVID-19 virus normally invades the body,” he added. In monkeys one week after vaccination, antibody levels increased nearly 100-fold and there were no side effects, Russell said. Vyriad is planning a human trial in collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration, according to a report from a study posted on bioRxiv on Monday prior to peer review.

Plants may help vaccine production

According to researchers developing nasal spray vaccines, the plant may one day be used to make the COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccines work by delivering antigens that are replicas of viral or bacterial fragments that train the immune system to recognize and defend against invaders. Vaccine antigens are usually produced in mammalian cells, but previous studies have suggested that it is cheaper and safer to produce them in tobacco-related Nikothiana benzamiana plants. In a current lab study posted on bioRxiv on Monday prior to peer review, antibodies from COVID-19 survivors were found to recognize plant-produced coronavirus antigens as “recognizing standard antigens produced in mammalian cells.” Recognized and responded in the same way. Alison Maclean, a research leader at the University of Ottawa, said. Intranasal vaccines do not replace traditional (injected) vaccines, but aim to add another layer of protection by stimulating the immune system protection of the airways to which the virus first attaches. is. Sprays are used to enhance immune protection while traveling or going to crowded events. “



Children with mild COVID-19 may not develop antibodies.Oral vaccine boosters are promising in monkey research, Health News, ET Health World

Source link Children with mild COVID-19 may not develop antibodies.Oral vaccine boosters are promising in monkey research, Health News, ET Health World

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