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ANU: Netflix Series Squid Game for Korean Culture-Indian Education | Latest Education News | Global Education News

The storyline has a great arc, high stake games are interesting, and the quality of production adds a lot of surprises and suspense.

Netflix has announced Squid Game as the most popular series to date, with more than 111 million fans since its debut within four weeks. But, as Michael Weaver writes, two ANU experts question whether it brings lasting interest to Korean popular culture.

Take some of your favorite childhood games like tug of war and marbles and turn them into voyeur life and death battles to earn more money than you ever know how to spend Please give me.

You may have already speculated that this is the premise of a squid game. This is a confronting Korean survival series that created cult-like followers on Netflix very quickly.

Masked men in bright jumpsuits dominate the fate of a group of deprived athletes in dark green and white tracksuits identified by number alone.

They agree to participate in a series of six simple yet creepy games. These games have fatal consequences when eliminated.

The squid game arrived on September 17th with almost no fanfare, but according to the streaming service giant, it is now the most watched Netflix series in history with 111 million views.

But does that lead to a lasting interest in Korean popular culture?

Roald Maliangkay, an associate professor of Korean studies at the ANU School of Culture, History and Linguistics (CHL), says people are attracted to the suspense of squid games and the universal and unique Korean story.

“The storyline has a great arc, high stake games are interesting, and the quality of production adds a lot of surprise and suspense,” he says.

“Partially inspired by Escher, the predicament of the two-color set and game contestants is often a nightmare, somewhat reminiscent of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971) and the TV series Prisoner (2009).”

Carol Hayes, also an associate professor of Japanese studies at CHL, said the dystopian story strikes chords in our pandemic world.

“Both horror and monster genres take advantage of our most urgent horrors, leading to the horrors of ancient folk culture and advancing to modern horrors,” says Hayes.

“They provide insight into the’chaos’ created by the imbalance between society and disfranchisement. In squid games, it’s ironic that the people at the edge are ultra-rich, very poor, and involved in debt and crime.

“Remove your personal identity and put numbers and symbols on everyone and you’ll step into Aldous Huxley’s wonderful New World space.”

The first game, Red Light, Green Light, sets the scene with a giant light-colored doll and a gladiator-like set, but Maliangkay says the name of the game is lost in the Western translation. say.

“The name of the first game is Mugunghwakkoch’ip’iŏssŭmnida (” Mukuge has bloomed “). Translated as “red light, green light,” Sharon’s rose also appears in the Korean national anthem, so the original meaning may be more ironic, “he says.

However, Maliangkay says that other aspects such as gambling and the pressures of everyday life are a great reflection of modern Korean society.

“A variety of urban environments are very well recognized, as are the lifelong connections people make at school and at work.

“Gambling is certainly a problem, but it may not be as big as it is depicted here. Managing day-to-day operations is a sufficient cause for many to borrow beyond their own means. . “

Written over a decade ago, the story is inspired by Japanese fiction and graphic manga comics and novels. Similar themes can be found in several films such as The Hunger Games series and the 2019 Korean Black Comedy / Thriller Parasite.

Hayes has an echo of Japan’s Battle Royale released in 2000 and Alice in Borderland from 2020, forcing participants in the “game” to kill each other and see their friends die to survive. Say you are.

“Encouraging people to fight each other, bet their lives, and kill their rivals is an ugly premise,” she says.

“Players are the scapegoat of the country’s problems swimming with first-world wealth, luxury, and the boring overdose it brings. Qualified rich people bet on these games to regain their interest in life. I clearly feel that is their right. “

The soaring squid game takes advantage of the ancient conflict of consumer dreams. Even if obviously not, money will make life better.

“The dehumanization of the group when individual identities are suppressed is the fear in South Korea and Japan of society returning to a nationalist military state,” says Hayes.

For Maliangkay, Squid Game provides an important social commentary on Asian culture and language.

“Korea is a really fascinating place, a very important middle power and offers more than what the mainstream media is talking about,” he says.

“It’s a shame that few people aren’t interested in Australia at all, despite the countless fans of Australian K-POP and squid games.”

ANU: Netflix Series Squid Game for Korean Culture-Indian Education | Latest Education News | Global Education News

Source link ANU: Netflix Series Squid Game for Korean Culture-Indian Education | Latest Education News | Global Education News

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